Peter Schweizer

Author, Clinton Cash
President, Government Accountability Institute

Leading the movement for more transparency from Politicians and their Institutions.

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Biography

Peter Schweizer is the President of Government Accountability Institute and a best-selling author. He is a partner in the Washington, D.C. firm Oval Office Writers which provides speechwriting and communications services for corporate executives and political figures. From 2008-9 he was a consultant to the Office of Presidential Speechwriting in the White House. He has also served as a member of the Ultraterrorism Study Group at the U.S. government’s Sandia National Laboratory and is a former consultant to NBC News.

In his current book, Clinton Cash, Peter follows the Clinton money trail, revealing the connection between their personal fortune, “their close personal friends”, the Clinton Foundation, foreign nations, and some of the highest ranks of government. He is also author of the best sellers, Extortion: How Politicians Extract Your Money, Buy Votes, and Line Their Own Pockets and Throw Them All Out. Both books were featured on CBS's 60 Minutes. His books have been translated into eleven languages. His articles have appeared in Foreign Affairs, The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, National Review, and elsewhere. He has appeared on numerous radio and television programs. Peter received his M.Phil. from Oxford University and his B.A. from George Washington University.

Books

Bush Bucks

How Public Service and Corporations Helped Make Jeb Rich

Peter Schweizer

In the eight years since he left the Florida governor’s mansion, Jeb Bush has raked in nearly $30 million. Who paid him and for what? And what “services” did Bush perform for those who gave him millions?

In Bush Bucks: How Public Service and Corporations Helped Make Jeb Rich, Government Accountability Institute (GAI) President and New York Times bestselling author Peter Schweizer and his team of GAI investigators perform a granular examination of former Florida Governor Jeb Bush’s financial dealings and accumulation of wealth. What unfolds is a disturbing pattern of cronyism and self-enrichment, one wherein the companies and individuals Bush benefited while governor, in turn, helped make Bush millions of dollars shortly after he left office.

Bush Bucks reveals:

  • How more than half of Jeb Bush’s post-gubernatorial income was derived from a handful of companies that benefitted while Bush was governor

  • How Bush provided “political intelligence” to Wall Street investment firms via Lehman Brothers and Barclays that gave them the inside track on pending mergers and acquisitions

  • How Jeb’s educational reforms enriched key companies that then put money in Bush’s foundations and pockets

Fact-based, quick-moving, and clear, Bush Bucks highlights a troubling constellation of cronyism and self-enrichment inside Bush world.

Smashwords (Oct 21, 2015)

Clinton Cash

The Untold Story of How and Why Foreign Governments and Businesses Helped Make Bill and Hillary Rich

Peter Schweizer

In 2000, Bill and Hillary Clinton owed millions of dollars in legal debt. Since then, they've earned over $130 million. Where did the money come from? Most people assume that the Clintons amassed their wealth through lucrative book deals and high-six figure fees for speaking gigs. Now, Peter Schweizer shows who is really behind those enormous payments.In his New York Times bestselling books Extortion and Throw Them All Out, Schweizer detailed patterns of official corruption in Washington that led to congressional resignations and new ethics laws. In Clinton Cash, he follows the Clinton money trail, revealing the connection between their personal fortune, “their close personal friends”, the Clinton Foundation, foreign nations, and some of the highest ranks of government. Schweizer reveals the Clintons troubling dealings in Kazakhstan, Colombia, Haiti, and other places at the wild west fringe of the global economy. In this blockbuster expose, Schweizer merely presents the troubling facts he s uncovered. Meticulously researched and scrupulously sourced, filled with headline-making revelations, Clinton Cash raises serious questions of judgment, of possible indebtedness to an array of foreign interests, and ultimately, of fitness for high public office.

Harper Paperbacks; Reprint edition (26 July 2016)
Harper (5 May 2015)

Extortion

How Politicians Extract Your Money, Buy Votes, and Line Their Own Pockets

Peter Schweizer

A bombshell investigation reveals how Washington really works: politicians extort money from us, then use it to buy each other’s votes.

Best-selling author Peter Schweizer reveals:

  • Obama’s "Protection Money": How the Obama Administration targeted industries for criminal investigation but chose not to pursue key political donors.
  • John Boehner’s "Tollbooth": How the Speaker of the House extracts money by soliciting political donations before he will hold crucial votes on the House floor.
  • The "Slush Fund": How politicians extract "campaign contributions" and then convert them to bankroll lavish lifestyles complete with limos, private jets, golf at five-star resorts, fine wines, and cash for family members.
  • Capitol Hill’s "Underground Economy": How congressmen use a little-known loophole that allows them to secretly link their votes to cash.

Extortion finally makes clear why Congress is so dysfunctional: it’s all about making money, not making law.

Houghton Mifflin (22 October 2013)

Throw Them All Out

How Politicians and Their Friends Get Rich Off Insider Stock Tips, Land Deals, and Cronyism That Would Send the Rest of Us to Prison

Peter Schweizer

One of the biggest scandals in American politics is waiting to explode: the full story of the inside game in Washington shows how the permanent political class enriches itself at the expense of the rest of us. Insider trading is illegal on Wall Street, yet it is routine among members of Congress. Normal individuals cannot get in on IPOs at the asking price, but politicians do so routinely. The Obama administration has been able to funnel hundreds of millions of dollars to its supporters, ensuring yet more campaign donations. An entire class of investors now makes all of its profits based on influence and access in Washington. Peter Schweizer has doggedly researched through mountains of financial records, tracking complicated deals and stock trades back to the timing of briefings, votes on bills, and every other point of leverage for politicians in Washington. The result is a manifesto for revolution: the Permanent Political Class must go.

Houghton Mifflin (15 November 2011)

Architects of Ruin

How Big Government Liberals Wrecked the Global Economy — and How They Will Do It Again If No One Stops Them

Peter Schweizer

In Architects of Ruin, New York Times bestselling author and conservative historian Peter Schweizer argues that the economic crisis was caused by liberals who used the power of government to create a subprime mortgage bubble that has ravaged the global economy. Rebutting charges that the financial collapse was caused by conservative deregulatory zeal, Schweizer, the author of Do as I Say (Not as I Do): Profiles in Liberal Hypocrisy, shows that it was actually the result of “do-good capitalism.”

Harper Paperbacks; Reprint edition (23 November 2010)

Makers and Takers

Why Conservatives Work Harder, Feel Happier, Have Closer Families, Take Fewer Drugs, Give More Generously, Value Honesty more, Are Less Materialistic And Envious, Whine Less... And Even Hug Their Children More Than Liberals

Peter Schweizer

In Makers and Takers you will discover why:

  • Seventy-one percent of conservatives say you have an obligation to care for a seriously injured spouse or parent versus less than half (46 percent) of liberals.

  • Conservatives have a better work ethic and are much less likely to call in sick than their liberal counterparts.

  • Liberals are 2½ times more likely to be resentful of others’ success and 50 percent more likely to be jealous of other people’s good luck.

  • Liberals are 2 times more likely to say it is okay to cheat the government out of welfare money you don’t deserve.

  • Conservatives are more likely than liberals to hug their children and “significantly more likely” to display positive nurturing emotions.

  • Liberals are less trusting of family members and much less likely to stay in touch with their parents.

  • Do you get satisfaction from putting someone else’s happiness ahead of your own? Fifty-five percent of conservatives said yes versus only 20 percent of liberals.

  • Rush Limbaugh, Ronald Reagan, Bill O’Reilly and Dick Cheney have given large sums of money to people in need, while Ted Kennedy, Nancy Pelosi, Michael Moore, and Al Gore have not.

Those who are “very liberal” are 3 times more likely than conservatives to throw things when they get angry.

The American left prides itself on being superior to conservatives: more generous, less materialistic, more tolerant, more intellectual, and more selfless. For years scholars have constructed — and the media has pushed — elaborate theories designed to demonstrate that conservatives suffer from a host of personality defects and character flaws. According to these supposedly unbiased studies, conservatives are mean-spirited, greedy, selfish malcontents with authoritarian tendencies. Far from the belief of a few cranks, prominent liberals from John Kenneth Galbraith to Hillary Clinton have succumbed to these prejudices. But what do the facts show?

Peter Schweizer has dug deep — through tax documents, scholarly data, primary opinion research surveys, and private records — and has discovered that these claims are a myth. Indeed, he shows that many of these claims actually apply more to liberals than conservatives. Much as he did in his bestseller Do as I Say (Not as I Do), he brings to light never-before-revealed facts that will upset conventional wisdom.

Conservatives such as Ronald Reagan and Robert Bork have long argued that liberal policies promote social decay. Schweizer, using the latest data and research, exposes how, in general:

_ Liberals are more self-centered than conservatives. - Conservatives are more generous and charitable than liberals. - Liberals are more envious and less hardworking than conservatives. - Conservatives value truth more than liberals, and are less prone to cheating and lying. - Liberals are more angry than conservatives. - Conservatives are actually more knowledgeable than liberals. - Liberals are more dissatisfied and unhappy than conservatives.

Schweizer argues that the failure lies in modern liberal ideas, which foster a self-centered, “if it feels good do it” attitude that leads liberals to outsource their responsibilities to the government and focus instead on themselves and their own desires.

Doubleday (3 June 2008)

Do As I Say (Not As I Do)

Profiles in Liberal Hypocrisy

Peter Schweizer

I don’t own a single share of stock.” — Michael Moore

Members of the liberal left exude an air of moral certitude. They pride themselves on being selflessly committed to the highest ideals and seem particularly confident of the purity of their motives and the evil nature of their opponents. To correct economic and social injustice, liberals support a whole litany of policies and principles: progressive taxes, affirmative action, greater regulation of corporations, raising the inheritance tax, strict environmental regulations, children’s rights, consumer rights, and much, much more.

But do they actually live by these beliefs? Peter Schweizer decided to investigate in depth the private lives of some prominent liberals: politicians like the Clintons, Nancy Pelosi, the Kennedys, and Ralph Nader; commentators like Michael Moore, Al Franken, Noam Chomsky, and Cornel West; entertainers and philanthropists like Barbra Streisand and George Soros. Using everything from real estate transactions, IRS records, court depositions, and their own public statements, he sought to examine whether they really live by the principles they so confidently advocate.

What he found was a long list of glaring contradictions. Michael Moore denounces oil and defense contractors as war profiteers. He also claims to have no stock portfolio, yet he owns shares in Halliburton, Boeing, and Honeywell and does his postproduction film work in Canada to avoid paying union wages in the United States. Noam Chomsky opposes the very concept of private property and calls the Pentagon “the worst institution in human history,” yet he and his wife have made millions of dollars in contract work for the Department of Defense and own two luxurious homes. Barbra Streisand prides herself as an environmental activist, yet she owns shares in a notorious strip-mining company. Hillary Clinton supports the right of thirteen-year-old girls to have abortions without parental consent, yet she forbade thirteen-year-old Chelsea to pierce her ears and enrolled her in a school that would not distribute condoms to minors. Nancy Pelosi received the 2002 Cesar Chavez Award from the United Farm Workers, yet she and her husband own a Napa Valley vineyard that uses nonunion labor.

Schweizer’s conclusion is simple: liberalism in the end forces its adherents to become hypocrites. They adopt one pose in public, but when it comes to what matters most in their own lives — their property, their privacy, and their children — they jettison their liberal principles and embrace conservative ones. Schweizer thus exposes the contradiction at the core of liberalism: if these ideas don’t work for the very individuals who promote them, how can they work for the rest of us?

Broadway Books; 1st Paperback Ed edition (10 October 2006)

Praise

“A spirited attack on lefty icons.”
New York Times

“An entertaining exposure . . . In a series of 11 profiles on leftist icons from Noam Chomsky and Al Franken to Hillary Clinton and Ted Kennedy, Schweizer reveals that the most vocal liberals do not practice what they preach.”
The Weekly Standard