Edward Luce

Chief U.S. commentator, Financial Times
Author, Time To Start Thinking

A international perspective on the United States.

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Biography

Edward Luce is one of the most highly read columnist at the Financial Times, where he has also served as Washington bureau chief, Capital Markets editor, and South Asia bureau chief. A native of the United Kingdom, Ed combines an expat’s critical eye with a Washington insider’s connections to offer a unique perspective on American politics and economics. His specialties include the Obama presidency, the revival of U.S. cities, and the decline of the U.S. middle class.

Ed is also a leading speaker on global issues and globalisation, with a particular focus on a rising India. The Economist declared his book In Spite of the Gods “likely to be the definitive book on India for some time to come.” He also speaks about China, the U.K., and U.S. relations with these countries. He is highly respected for his experience.

His most recent book is Time to Start Thinking: America and the Spectre of Decline. Here Ed argues that America’s traditional pragmatism has been eroded over the last few decades, leaving a country ill-prepared to approach its current crises in a constructive way. Unless America is prepared to start thinking seriously about solutions, Ed warns, it could well lose its unchallenged global leadership status.

In addition to his history at the FT, Ed has served at the Guardian as its Geneva correspondent. From 1999 to 2001, he was speechwriter to Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers. Ed is also an experienced and accomplished moderator.

Books

Time to Start Thinking

America and the Spectre of Decline

Edward Luce

On its present course, the US faces a world of rising new countries that will compete with it ever more fiecely as its own power is declining. In order to slow and improve this steady leakage of power, the US must change course internationally, economically and domestically. It must also restructure to remain the world's most competitive economy. And it must address quality of life issues and fairness at home.

But American politics is broken — competing forces and interests have led to stasis. With change so tough, where now for a country where the middle classes are suffering as they have never suffered before, the pensions crisis is growing, the deficit out of sight, and radicalism waiting in the wings?

Abacus (30 May 2013)
Little, Brown (3 April 2012)

In Spite of the Gods

The Strange Rise of Modern India

Edward Luce

India is poised to become one of the world's three largest economies in the next generation and to overtake China as the world's most populous country by 2032. Well before then India's incipient nuclear deterrent will have acquired intercontinental range and air, sea and land capabilities. India's volatile relationship with its nuclear-armed neighbour, Pakistan, may prove to be the source of the world's next major conflict. And if you call anyone- from your bank to rail enquiries- your query may well be dealt with by a graduate in Gujarat. Any way one looks at it, India's fate matters. Edward Luce, one of the most incisive and talented journalists of his generation, assesses the forces that are forging the new nation. Cutting through the miasma that still clouds thinking about India, this extraordinarily accomplished book takes the measure of a society that is struggling to come to grips with modernity. Drawing on historical research, existing literature and his own unparalleled access as the New Delhi-based, South Asia correspondent of the FT, this is a book that will enthral as well as educate and will remain the definitive book on the country for many years.

Abacus (7 July 2011)

Review

The Power of the Potential of India's Economic ChangeThe New York Times
Midnight's Grandchildren — Sunday Book Review, The New York Times

Videos

Conversation on Aviation with The Boeing Company and United Airlines | The Chicago Forum on Global Cities

Obama's Moment | Charlie Rose

Ed Luce moderated a discussion with Hank Paulson on China | The Chicago Council on Global Affairs

It's 'Time to Start Thinking' America | PBS NewsHour

Feedback

A financial services company:
Dear Ed — Our whole board of trustees thanks you for such a good discussion at our dinner. You could tell that people were very interested in better understanding all that is occurring in the Middle East as well as other global powers, and you were particularly helpful. And now I hope that everyone in that room read your column in today’s FT. You bring a historic perspective — lessons from the past — that provides an excellent context and you have a keen depth of knowledge which assures a fair and full consideration of all the complexities. You help people understand the facts as well as realistic expectations. It was clear that people were engaged and deeply interested from the extent of the questions and we continued to talk about your comments the following day. You lifted our knowledge in important ways. You were also a delight to talk with. I think everyone felt privileged that we had been able to spend this time together and hear your good thoughts and analysis. I send our thanks and our very best on behalf of the entire board of trustees.

Articles

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